Not currently on display at the V&A

Waistcoat

1845-1850 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

In the 19th century waistcoats tended to be one of the more elaborate and colourful pieces of the male wardrobe, which is partly why they survive in relatively large numbers. They might also have been kept for their decorative quality or for sentimental reasons when they went out of fashion.

This waistcoat has a curved roll collar and fits neatly to just below the waist, dating it in style to 1845 to 1850. The pockets on each forepart, the lapels and the bottom edges of this waistcoat are finished with a fine braid. The back is a deep red silk and it is lined with cream glazed cotton.

Peacock feathers were a popular motif for fabrics worn by both men and women in the middle and later part of the 19th century. In some instances interpreted as symbolic of vanity and luxury, the peacock also represented gracious or knightly demeanour in medieval times, the resurrection and eternal life, and the beauty of an eternity to come in heaven.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Jacquard-woven silk satin, wood, backed with silk, lined with glazed cotton
Brief Description
Man's waistcoat of Jacquard-woven silk satin, textile woven in Spitalfields, made in Great Britain, 1845-1850
Physical Description
Man's waistcoat of Jacquard-woven silk satin with a roll collar. With a pattern of peacock feathers and pendulous flower forms surrounding the feathers in cream, blue and fawn on a dark red satin ground. With simple shaped lapels edged with braid. Six covered hand-made buttons constructed over a wooden core that fasten at the lower front and with a pocket at either side edged with a fine braid. Backed with deep red silk and lined with cream glazed cotton.
Dimensions
  • Weight: 0.48kg
  • Centre back length: 15.25in
  • Across back width: 16.25in
Credit line
Given by Mr H. Arnold Ovenden
Subject depicted
Summary
In the 19th century waistcoats tended to be one of the more elaborate and colourful pieces of the male wardrobe, which is partly why they survive in relatively large numbers. They might also have been kept for their decorative quality or for sentimental reasons when they went out of fashion.



This waistcoat has a curved roll collar and fits neatly to just below the waist, dating it in style to 1845 to 1850. The pockets on each forepart, the lapels and the bottom edges of this waistcoat are finished with a fine braid. The back is a deep red silk and it is lined with cream glazed cotton.



Peacock feathers were a popular motif for fabrics worn by both men and women in the middle and later part of the 19th century. In some instances interpreted as symbolic of vanity and luxury, the peacock also represented gracious or knightly demeanour in medieval times, the resurrection and eternal life, and the beauty of an eternity to come in heaven.
Collection
Accession Number
T.1-1954

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record createdSeptember 27, 2006
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