Bustle thumbnail 1
Bustle thumbnail 2
+1
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Bustle

1870-1875 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This bustle is made of stiff layered folds of horsehair and linen fabric. The fabric was known as 'crinoline', derived from 'crin', the French term for horsehair. This fabric was also used to make the stiff petticoats used to hold in shape the large skirts of the 1840s. The term crinoline was later used for the graduated spring-steel hoops used for the larger skirts of the 1850s and 1860s.

This bustle is constructed of horizontal and vertical steels, which support the gathered rows of fabric. The bustle shape is obtained by lacing bands with eyelet holes, which when laced and pulled up cause the back of the bustle to curve and be held firmly in shape. There are hooks at the waist to fasten the bustle onto a petticoat and two pairs of ties to secure it around the waist and hips.
read Corsets, crinolines and bustles: fashionable Victorian underwear
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Horsehair woven with linen, horizontal and vertical steels, laced eyelet holes
Physical Description
Bustle made of four gathered rows of horsehair and linen fabric on a base of horizontal and vertical steels.
Gallery Label
  • By the mid-1870s, the skirt had narrowed still further, with an emphasis on the bustle, train and drapery at the back. The fashionable bodice - known as the 'cuirass' bodice - was elongated with a seamless waist ending at, or below, the hips. The bustle was known as a 'tournure', or 'dress improver', as the word 'bustle' was considered vulgar by Victorian ladies. Bustle pad British, 1870-5 Horsehair woven with linen, cotton, steels and laced eyelet holes Given by Miss Barbara V. Cooper(2013-2015)
  • Made from horsehair Bustles were worn to support the back drapery of women's dresses from about 1869-80. They were reintroduced around 1883 but disappeared by the end of the decade. This example is constructed from crinoline made from horsehair [French: crin] woven with linen. The fabric is stiff and holds its shapes when stitched in place. Bustle Britain, 1870-5 Horsehair woven with linen, cotton, steel and metal eyelet holes V&A: T.168-1937 Given by Miss Barbara V. Cooper(16/04/2016-12/03/2017)
Credit line
Given by Miss Barbara V. Cooper
Summary
This bustle is made of stiff layered folds of horsehair and linen fabric. The fabric was known as 'crinoline', derived from 'crin', the French term for horsehair. This fabric was also used to make the stiff petticoats used to hold in shape the large skirts of the 1840s. The term crinoline was later used for the graduated spring-steel hoops used for the larger skirts of the 1850s and 1860s.



This bustle is constructed of horizontal and vertical steels, which support the gathered rows of fabric. The bustle shape is obtained by lacing bands with eyelet holes, which when laced and pulled up cause the back of the bustle to curve and be held firmly in shape. There are hooks at the waist to fasten the bustle onto a petticoat and two pairs of ties to secure it around the waist and hips.
Collection
Accession Number
T.168-1937

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdSeptember 27, 2006
Record URL