Pendant thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Pendant

ca. 1900 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Established in 1875, Liberty's department store in London built its reputation on supplying artistic and unusual products. In 1899 it launched a line of 'Cymric' jewellery, which drew both the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts styles. Cymric jewellery featured sinuous lines, unusual gemstones and often appeared to be hand-beaten. However, it was commercially produced using machine processes - something which enraged Arts and Crafts jewellers like C.R. Ashbee.

Cymric jewellery was very popular. Its success was partly due to the innovation and talent of the designers employed by Liberty, including Archibald Knox, who designed this piece. Knox was a designer and teacher from the Isle of Man, and was responsible for some of the Cymric range's most exceptional designs, particularly those based on Celtic interlace.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Enamelled gold
Brief Description
Enamelled gold pendant for the Cymric jewellery range of Liberty & Company, Regent Street, designed by Archibald Knox, made by W H Haseler & Co., Birmingham, about 1900
Physical Description
Enamelled gold pendant for the Cymric jewellery range of Liberty & Company
Dimensions
  • Height: 4.8cm
  • Width: 2.1cm
  • Depth: 0.5cm
Style
Credit line
Bought with the assistance of the Harrap Bequest
Production
Produced for the Cymric jewellery range by Liberty & Company
Subject depicted
Summary
Established in 1875, Liberty's department store in London built its reputation on supplying artistic and unusual products. In 1899 it launched a line of 'Cymric' jewellery, which drew both the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts styles. Cymric jewellery featured sinuous lines, unusual gemstones and often appeared to be hand-beaten. However, it was commercially produced using machine processes - something which enraged Arts and Crafts jewellers like C.R. Ashbee.



Cymric jewellery was very popular. Its success was partly due to the innovation and talent of the designers employed by Liberty, including Archibald Knox, who designed this piece. Knox was a designer and teacher from the Isle of Man, and was responsible for some of the Cymric range's most exceptional designs, particularly those based on Celtic interlace.
Collection
Accession Number
M.30-1964

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record createdAugust 23, 2006
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