Locket thumbnail 1
Locket thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91 to 93 mezzanine, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Locket

1775-1800 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Memorial jewellery to honour the dead is one of the largest categories of 18th- century jewellery to survive.
From 1760 there was a new vogue for memorial medallions or lockets. These became especially popular in Britain, though similar work was produced throughout Europe.

The lockets could be bought ready made, and the designs were standardised. Neo-classical motifs of funerary urns, plinths and obelisks joined the more traditional cherubs, angels and weeping willows. Hair was preserved as curls within the locket or cut up and used to create designs.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gold set, blue enamel with seed pearls with ivory painted with watercolour
Brief Description
Gold locket, blue enamel set with seed pearls, ivory painted in watercolours, England, 1775-1800
Physical Description
Gold bracelet clasp converted into a locket composed of a frame set with seed pearls, ivory painted in watercolours of a woman with a dove and a crane mounted on an enamelled blue ground embellished with seed pearls.
Dimensions
  • Height: 5.1cm
  • Width: 2.8cm
  • Depth: 0.8cm
Object history
Part of a group of memorial and mourning jewels bought from Dr Marco Guastalla, acting on behalf of 'an English lady residing in Italy' (museum numbers 846-1888 to 989-1888)
Subjects depicted
Summary
Memorial jewellery to honour the dead is one of the largest categories of 18th- century jewellery to survive.

From 1760 there was a new vogue for memorial medallions or lockets. These became especially popular in Britain, though similar work was produced throughout Europe.



The lockets could be bought ready made, and the designs were standardised. Neo-classical motifs of funerary urns, plinths and obelisks joined the more traditional cherubs, angels and weeping willows. Hair was preserved as curls within the locket or cut up and used to create designs.
Collection
Accession Number
923-1888

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record createdAugust 22, 2006
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