Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A Dundee
Scottish Design Galleries, V&A Dundee

Fan

ca. 1745 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The leaf of this fan is engraved and has been hand coloured and over-painted. The only part of the original engraved design that has been retained is the central panel showing a man in mid-18th century armour accompanied by the classical Gods Mars and Minerva.

The man is Prince Charles Edward Stuart (1720-1788) who led the unsuccessful Jacobite rebellion of 1745. At his side there is an altar blazing with devoted hearts. Fans such as this were said to have been distributed by the Prince to ladies at a ball at Holyrood House in Edinburgh, held to celebrate his victory at the Battle of Prestonpans. A fan like this was a symbol of support for the Jacobite cause and a potentially dangerous possession.

The over-painting tones down the imagery of the engraving which showed the god Jupiter destroying the Hanovarian faction together with allegories of Rapine and Murder. The decorative panels that replace these scenes echo ancient Roman wall paintings.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraved leaf, painted with gouache, carved and pierced ivory sticks
Brief Description
Folding fan consisting of an engraved leaf painted over with gouache, probably made in Great Britain, ca. 1745, depicting Prince Charles Edward Stuart, with carved and pierced sticks



Physical Description
Folding fan consisting of an engraved leaf painted over with gouache. The painting obliterates much of the original printed design and only the central panel follows the printed image. The central panel shows an armed man (thought to be Prince Charles Edward Stuart 'Bonnie Prince Charlie') supported by Mars and Minerva. At his side is an altar blazing with devoted hearts. To either side are smaller compartments with trophies, classical ladies and Neoclassical decoration. The decoration surrounding the central panel is loosely based on the style of classical Roman wall paintings. The sticks are finely carved and pierced with Neoclassical decoration. Screw-type rivet. The fan is possibly a Jacobite fan.
Dimensions
  • Length: 27cm (Note: length of guard )
  • Width: 48cm (Note: width of leaf when fan is fully open)
Credit line
Given by HM Queen Mary
Object history
The printed fan leaf was probably made ca. 1745 (possibly to commemorate the Battle of Prestonpans, Scotland, for the Jacobite rising of 1745). However the leaf has been over-painted at some point and the fan sticks do not seem contemporary - they are not a perfect fit with the leaf.



Another version is in the Schreiber Collection at the British Museum, museum number 1891,071.144. This identifies the print as Prince Charles Edward Stuart in armour attended by Cameron of Lochiel as Mars and Flora MacDonald as Bellona; Fame holds a laurel wreath over his head as a lion defeats a doe. The other scenes obscured on the V&A fan show Venus and Cupid at left; near them, Britannia, to whom a dove delivers an olive branch; at right, Jupiter in the clouds strikes down Envy and Discord with his thunderbolt as the family of Hanover retreats in the background. The print is attributed to Sir Robert Strange.



There is a further version in the National Museum of Scotland, and one sold at Sothebys, London, 12/12/2012, lot 30.
Subjects depicted
Summary
The leaf of this fan is engraved and has been hand coloured and over-painted. The only part of the original engraved design that has been retained is the central panel showing a man in mid-18th century armour accompanied by the classical Gods Mars and Minerva.



The man is Prince Charles Edward Stuart (1720-1788) who led the unsuccessful Jacobite rebellion of 1745. At his side there is an altar blazing with devoted hearts. Fans such as this were said to have been distributed by the Prince to ladies at a ball at Holyrood House in Edinburgh, held to celebrate his victory at the Battle of Prestonpans. A fan like this was a symbol of support for the Jacobite cause and a potentially dangerous possession.



The over-painting tones down the imagery of the engraving which showed the god Jupiter destroying the Hanovarian faction together with allegories of Rapine and Murder. The decorative panels that replace these scenes echo ancient Roman wall paintings.
Collection
Accession Number
T.204-1959

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record createdJuly 24, 2006
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