Incense Burner thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 137, The Curtain Foundation Gallery

Incense Burner

16th century to 17th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This incense burner was made in kilns at Dehua, in the south-eastern coastal province of Fujian. Dehua porcelain is creamy-white, hard and very translucent. It was known in Europe as 'Blanc de Chine'.

During the Song dynasty (960–1279), scholars studied ancient bronze vessels in the imperial collection of arts and artefacts. To attract these academic customers, potters began to make ceramics in the form of antique bronze vessels. This incense burner adopts the shape of an ancient bronze vessel called a ding (a tripod with a rounded belly).


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Incense Burner
  • Stand
Brief Description
Dehua ware. Incense burner, China (Dehua), 16th-17th century
Physical Description
Dehua tripod incense burner of porcelain, with wooden stand.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 11.5cm
Styles
Gallery Label
INCENSE BURNER 16th–17th century, Qing dynasty During the Song dynasty (960–1279), scholars studied ancient bronze vessels in the imperial collection of arts and artefacts. To attract these academic customers, potters began to make ceramics in the form of antique bronze vessels. This incense burner adopts the shape of an ancient bronze vessel called a ding (a tripod with a rounded belly). Porcelain with clear glaze Accepted by HM Government in lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2005 Museum no. FE.302-2005 明 德化窯白釉鼎式爐 (06/08/2019)
Credit line
Accepted by HM Government in lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2005
Summary
This incense burner was made in kilns at Dehua, in the south-eastern coastal province of Fujian. Dehua porcelain is creamy-white, hard and very translucent. It was known in Europe as 'Blanc de Chine'.



During the Song dynasty (960–1279), scholars studied ancient bronze vessels in the imperial collection of arts and artefacts. To attract these academic customers, potters began to make ceramics in the form of antique bronze vessels. This incense burner adopts the shape of an ancient bronze vessel called a ding (a tripod with a rounded belly).
Collection
Accession Number
FE.302:1, 2-2005

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record createdJuly 19, 2006
Record URL