Mrs. Bloomer's Own thumbnail 1
Mrs. Bloomer's Own thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Mrs. Bloomer's Own

Music
ca. 19th century - early 20th century (published)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Front cover of music sheet for Mrs. Bloomer's Own, composed by Edmond Reyloff. Front cover lithograph by J. Coventry, printed by M. & N. Hanhart. Published ca. 19th century - early 20th century.

These songs celebrate Mrs Amelia Bloomer and her unconventional clothing! Mrs Bloomer was an Nineteenth century American liberal reformer, who campaigned against slavery, and for temperance and women"s rights. Hearing that some women had been attacked by the media for wearing pantaloons and not the conventional crinoline dresses, she started to wear them herself. Amelia embarked on a national lecture tour, and soon became famous across the United States for her wearing these garments. Soon the name Bloomer became synonymous with women"s loose knee-length trousers, and later with long loose underwear. Four pieces of ballroom dance music were sold with this cover: a schottische, a quadrille, a galop and some waltzes. Schottisches had a quick tempo like a polka, and were popular at this time. Quadrilles were also fashionable, especially after Napoleon favoured them at his court. They were a type of square dance, and many popular songs were adapted for this dance. Galops, as their name suggests, were also a quick dance. Waltzes could be of any tempo, quick or slow. One can imagine how wearing bloomers would be very appropriate for these quick dances!


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Lithograph on paper
Brief Description
Front cover of music sheet for Mrs. Bloomer's Own, composed by Edmond Reyloff, published ca. 19th century - early 20th century.
Physical Description
Front cover of music sheet for Mrs. Bloomer's Own, composed by Edmond Reyloff. Illustrated in sepia and pink, with scene showing two young women in a garden setting; one seated on a wooden seat, with large plinth with huge urn behind. Both women are wearing maroon dresses and coats with their bloomers clearly visible, both have wide hats with pink ribbon, the one on the right is holding hers in her lefty hand.

Front cover only.
Dimensions
  • Height: 34.5cm
  • Width: 24.1cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'Mrs. Bloomer's Own / J. Coventry, lith / M. & N. Hanhart Impt. / No.1 Schottische 2/6. / No.2 Quadrille 3/s. / No. 3 Galop 2/6. / No. 4 Waltzes / Composed by Edmond Reyloff' (Printed on front cover.)
Credit line
Gabrielle Enthoven Collection
Literary ReferenceMrs. Bloomer's Own
Summary
Front cover of music sheet for Mrs. Bloomer's Own, composed by Edmond Reyloff. Front cover lithograph by J. Coventry, printed by M. & N. Hanhart. Published ca. 19th century - early 20th century.



These songs celebrate Mrs Amelia Bloomer and her unconventional clothing! Mrs Bloomer was an Nineteenth century American liberal reformer, who campaigned against slavery, and for temperance and women"s rights. Hearing that some women had been attacked by the media for wearing pantaloons and not the conventional crinoline dresses, she started to wear them herself. Amelia embarked on a national lecture tour, and soon became famous across the United States for her wearing these garments. Soon the name Bloomer became synonymous with women"s loose knee-length trousers, and later with long loose underwear. Four pieces of ballroom dance music were sold with this cover: a schottische, a quadrille, a galop and some waltzes. Schottisches had a quick tempo like a polka, and were popular at this time. Quadrilles were also fashionable, especially after Napoleon favoured them at his court. They were a type of square dance, and many popular songs were adapted for this dance. Galops, as their name suggests, were also a quick dance. Waltzes could be of any tempo, quick or slow. One can imagine how wearing bloomers would be very appropriate for these quick dances!
Other Numbers
  • PPUK 231 - PeoplePlay UK number
  • 7209 - Negative number
Collection
Accession Number
S.345-2012

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdApril 27, 2012
Record URL