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Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2A, Shelf DR78, Box LOANS

The Doorway

Print
ca. 1879 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

In 1879 Whistler was commissioned by the Fine Art Society to make a set of etchings of Venice. This is a printmaking technique in which acid is used to bite lines in a metal plate. These lines are next filled with ink, which is then printed on to paper.

Whistler was one of the first artists to put his pencilled signature to a print. This practice grew up during the second half of the 19th century in order to identify works printed from surfaces made by the artist him- or herself, as opposed to reproductions of works originally created in other media.

Object details

Category
Object type
Titles
  • The Doorway (assigned by artist)
  • Venice, a Series of Twelve Etchings (series title)
Materials and techniques
Etching and drypoint on paper
Brief description
'The Doorway', etching and drypoint by James McNeill Whistler, 1879, from Venice, a Series of Twelve Etchings, published by the Fine Art Society, London, 1880.
Physical description
Etching and drypoint by James McNeill Whistler, 'The Doorway', 1879. From 'Venice, a Series of Twelve Etchings', published by the Fine Art Society, London, 1880. Also known as 'The First Venice Set'. View of a wide doorway, ornately decorated, with a view into a dark interior and a young woman standing on the steps leading to the water's edge.
Dimensions
  • Height: 29.5cm
  • Width: 20.1cm
Cut.
Object history
Print from 'Venice, a series of Twelve Etchings', published by the Fine Art Society, London, 1880. Also known as ‘The First Venice Set’. W.154; K.188, 7th state.
Production
The original drawing was probably made in Venice.
Subject depicted
Place depicted
Summary
In 1879 Whistler was commissioned by the Fine Art Society to make a set of etchings of Venice. This is a printmaking technique in which acid is used to bite lines in a metal plate. These lines are next filled with ink, which is then printed on to paper.

Whistler was one of the first artists to put his pencilled signature to a print. This practice grew up during the second half of the 19th century in order to identify works printed from surfaces made by the artist him- or herself, as opposed to reproductions of works originally created in other media.
Associated objects
Bibliographic references
  • Wedmore, Frederick. Whistler's Etchings, A Study and a Catalogue. London: Colnaghi & Co, 1899. No.154.
  • Kennedy, Edward G. The Etched Work of Whistler. San Francisco: Alan Wofsy Fine Arts, 1978. No.188, 7th state.
  • Taken from Departmental Circulation Register 1965
Collection
Accession number
CIRC.168-1965

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Record createdMay 25, 2006
Record URL
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