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Installation - Elegy

Elegy

  • Object:

    Installation

  • Place of origin:

    Stoke-on-Trent (made)

  • Date:

    2009 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Brownsword, Neil, born 1970 (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Glazed ceramic

  • Credit Line:

    Acquired through the generosity of Gerard and Sarah Griffin

  • Museum number:

    C.123:1 to 17-2011

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

'Elegy' was made in response to the destruction of Royal Doulton's Nile Street factory in Stoke-on-Trent. The factory had operated since the 1870s. The work appears like a series of industrial archaeological finds. The distorted forms of the pieces refer to byproducts of the ceramic manufacturing process. Their surface qualities meanwhile draw on the traditions of fine Staffordshire salt- and lead-glazed wares. The ceramic pieces are part of an installation that includes video footage of the factory's demolition.

Physical description

Installation work comprising seventeen individual ceramic forms of varying sizes arranged in a configuration determined by the artist. As originally specified, the work should be displayed on a low plinth of dimenions 2200 x 1200 x 120mm. The complete work also includes a video projection (Museum no. C.124-2011).

Place of Origin

Stoke-on-Trent (made)

Date

2009 (made)

Artist/maker

Brownsword, Neil, born 1970 (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Glazed ceramic

Dimensions

Width: 220 cm, Depth: 120 cm

Object history note

Shown in the 'Awards' exhibition held at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, as part of the British Ceramics Biennial, 3 October - 13 December 2009, at which Neil Brownsword was recipient of the "One-Off Award" for unique work.

Descriptive line

Installation comprising seventeen ceramic forms, 'Elegy', Neil Brownsword, Stoke-on-Trent, 2009

Labels and date

Neil Brownsword (born 1970)
‘Elegy’
2009
‘Elegy’ was made in response to the
destruction of Royal Doulton’s Nile Street
factory in Stoke-on-Trent. The factory had
operated since the 1870s. The work appears
like a series of industrial archaeological finds.
The distorted forms of the pieces refer to
by-products of the ceramic manufacturing
process. Their surface qualities meanwhile
draw on the traditions of fine Staffordshire
salt- and lead-glazed wares. The ceramic
pieces are part of an installation that includes
video footage of the factory’s demolition.
Made in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire
Glazed ceramic
Museum no. C.123:1 to 17-2011
Acquired through the generosity of Gerard and Sarah Griffin [12/2013]

Materials

Ceramic

Categories

Ceramics; Studio Pottery

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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