OLPC XO-1 thumbnail 1
OLPC XO-1 thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Design 1900 to Now, Room 76

This object consists of 5 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

OLPC XO-1

Laptop
2005 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The XO laptop is designed as part of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative, a non-profit organisation created by MIT Professor Nicholas Negroponte in 2002. The XO was designed to withstand varying weather and environmental conditions, with no hard drive and only two internal cables as research by Fuseproject, the design partner appointed by OLPC, found that these were the two elements most likely to fail.

The casing has two green 'ears' that act as Wi-Fi antennae, appealing to children, and a rechargeable battery provides up to 22.8 Watt-hours. The screen pivots around so that the laptop can be used as an eBook reader, while the keyboard is a single rubberised sheet to prevent dust and water entering, with smaller keys than a normal keyboard, again designed for children.

The XO laptop is designed to operate as part of a communal open network allowing the distribution of knowledge and learning through open-source applications and software. The laptops have Wi-Fi antenna that are three times as powerful as a standard laptop and can create a mesh network where if one laptop is connected to a network, all others nearby can connect to this first laptop and share this network too. The laptops can run on both Linux and Windows XP operating systems.

The Fuseproject agency was founded by Yves Béhar in San Francisco in 1999. Béhar was born in Switzerland and was educated in Europe and in the US. His work was featured in monographic exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museé de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains in Lausanne in 2004. The following year he was appointed chair of the Industrial Design programme at the California College of the Arts, a position he currently holds. Fuseproject has worked with Herman Miller, Puma, Swarovski, Danese, BMW Mini and Coca Cola.



object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 5 parts.

  • Laptop
  • Power Cord and Plug for Laptop
  • Box for Laptop
  • Instructions
  • Battery
Materials and Techniques
PC/ABS plastic, rubber, electronics
Brief Description
'One Laptop Per Child' laptop, designed by Yves Béhar, 2005
Physical Description
Convertible laptop with Pivoting, reversible display, dirt and moisture-resistant system enclosure. The laptop has the size of a general textbook and is lighter than a lunch box. It has soft edges, a handle and a rubber keyboard. It is claimed to be recyclable, drop-proof, splash-proof and dustproof. It can be manually recharged.
Dimensions
  • Height: 30mm
  • Width: 230mm
  • Depth: 240mm
Credit line
Given by Yves Behar/ Fuseproject
Summary
The XO laptop is designed as part of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative, a non-profit organisation created by MIT Professor Nicholas Negroponte in 2002. The XO was designed to withstand varying weather and environmental conditions, with no hard drive and only two internal cables as research by Fuseproject, the design partner appointed by OLPC, found that these were the two elements most likely to fail.



The casing has two green 'ears' that act as Wi-Fi antennae, appealing to children, and a rechargeable battery provides up to 22.8 Watt-hours. The screen pivots around so that the laptop can be used as an eBook reader, while the keyboard is a single rubberised sheet to prevent dust and water entering, with smaller keys than a normal keyboard, again designed for children.



The XO laptop is designed to operate as part of a communal open network allowing the distribution of knowledge and learning through open-source applications and software. The laptops have Wi-Fi antenna that are three times as powerful as a standard laptop and can create a mesh network where if one laptop is connected to a network, all others nearby can connect to this first laptop and share this network too. The laptops can run on both Linux and Windows XP operating systems.



The Fuseproject agency was founded by Yves Béhar in San Francisco in 1999. Béhar was born in Switzerland and was educated in Europe and in the US. His work was featured in monographic exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museé de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains in Lausanne in 2004. The following year he was appointed chair of the Industrial Design programme at the California College of the Arts, a position he currently holds. Fuseproject has worked with Herman Miller, Puma, Swarovski, Danese, BMW Mini and Coca Cola.



Collection
Accession Number
W.9:1 to 5-2011

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record createdJuly 12, 2011
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