Ring

100-200 (made)
Ring thumbnail 1
Ring thumbnail 2
+1
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This ring takes the form of a spiral and ends in a snake's head.
Roman jewellery borrowed heavily from Hellenistic goldwork. This particular type was common in Hellenistic times, especially in Egypt.
Snakes were the symbol of a number of deities associated with healing, including the Egyptian goddess Isis and the Greek god of medicine Asclepios. It was therefore a commonly used pattern in jewellery, its spiral shape lending itself well to rings and necklaces. Worn as an amulet, the snake protected its wearer.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Chased gold
Brief Description
Gold serpent ring, formed of two coils terminating in two chased snake heads, Roman Empire, 100-200 AD
Physical Description
Gold serpent ring, formed of two coils terminating in two chased cobra heads.
Dimensions
  • Height: 2.2cm
  • Width: 2.3cm
  • Depth: 2.9cm
Style
Credit line
Given by Dame Joan Evans
Subjects depicted
Summary
This ring takes the form of a spiral and ends in a snake's head.

Roman jewellery borrowed heavily from Hellenistic goldwork. This particular type was common in Hellenistic times, especially in Egypt.

Snakes were the symbol of a number of deities associated with healing, including the Egyptian goddess Isis and the Greek god of medicine Asclepios. It was therefore a commonly used pattern in jewellery, its spiral shape lending itself well to rings and necklaces. Worn as an amulet, the snake protected its wearer.
Bibliographic Reference
Hindman, Sandra ed. Cycles of life: rings from the Benjamin Zucker family collection, London, 2014, p.39
Collection
Accession Number
M.135-1962

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record createdMarch 21, 2006
Record URL