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Teapot

Teapot

  • Place of origin:

    Tibet (made)

  • Date:

    early 19th century (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    The vessel is made of hammered copper, with brass rim. The inside is coated with tin

  • Museum number:

    IM.7-1915

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Large teapots of this type are still used in Tibetan monasteries to serve tea to rows of seated monks during religious ceremonies in monastery halls. The two handles help the server steady his hands as he pours. The design, with its distinctive side in the shape of a monk's headdress, has been used since at least the early 15th century, when it was copied in Chinese porcelain.

Physical description

Monks cap ewer, with two plain handles, one on the left hand side, and one at the back. The lobed rim rises behind to an ogee-form. The deeply channelled spout is straight on top and curved underneath.

Place of Origin

Tibet (made)

Date

early 19th century (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

The vessel is made of hammered copper, with brass rim. The inside is coated with tin

Dimensions

Height: 36.8 cm, Width: 33.5 cm

Descriptive line

Monks cap ewer, copper brass, Tibet, early 19th century

Materials

Copper; Brass; Tin

Techniques

Hammering

Categories

Containers; Tea, Coffee & Chocolate wares

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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