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Trousers

Trousers

  • Place of origin:

    Great Britain (made)

  • Date:

    mid 1990s (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Daks-Simpson (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Terylene polyester and wool worsted mix

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Ken Hylton-Smith

  • Museum number:

    T.46:2-1997

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

In 1884, The Gentleman’s Magazine of Fashion advised readers that: ‘Every man with a grain of respectability on the river puts on white trousers, with white flannel shirt, straw hat, striped flannel coat’. The ‘striped coat’ was the blazer, which became popular during this period. The look has changed little up to the present day, with many oarsmen continuing to wear their college colours. In 1897 the Leander Club decided to employ the colour cerise pink to create a distinctive identity. Members wear cerise ties and socks and use grosgrain ribbon in the same colour to trim their boaters.

Physical description

Trousers made of white terylene polyester and wool worsted mix.

Place of Origin

Great Britain (made)

Date

mid 1990s (made)

Artist/maker

Daks-Simpson (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Terylene polyester and wool worsted mix

Object history note

Part of a rowing club ensemble T.46:1 to 7-1997.

Historical context note

1818 Leander Club was founded as a 'Subscription Room'. The first constitution was written in 1845 when there were 17 members - today there are 2,700.
1897 the Club moved to its present site at Henley-on-Thames.
Since 1947 Leander Athletes have won 26 medals in World Championships and Olympic Regattas.

Descriptive line

Trousers made of terylene polyester and wool worsted, made by Daks-Simpson, Great Britain, mid 1990s

Labels and date

In 1884 'The Gentleman's magazine of Fashion' advised readers that 'Every man with a grain of respectability on the river puts on white trousers, with white flannel shirt, straw hat, striped flannel coat.' The 'striped coat' was the blazer, which became popular during this period. The look has changed little up to the present day, with many oarsmen continuing to wear their college colours. In 1897 the Leander Club decided to employ the colour cerise pink to create a distinctive identity. Members wear cerise ties and socks and use grosgrain ribbon in the same colours to trim their boaters. [1997]

Production Note

Leander Club uniform

Materials

Polyester; Worsted

Categories

Men's clothes; Fashion; Sport; Textiles

Collection

Textiles and Fashion Collection

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