Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Cooling vessel

Cooling vessel

  • Place of origin:

    Monte Bagnolo (made)

  • Date:

    mid 16th century (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Durantino, Francesco (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Tin-glazed earthenware, painted in colours

  • Museum number:

    533-1865

  • Gallery location:

    Ceramics, Room 137, The Curtain Foundation Gallery, case 40, shelf 6

Large basins like this were used as cooling vessels for wine at the dinner table. In contemporary images, they are often situated on the floor, besides the table, with servants retrieve bottles of wine from them to serve to the diners. Wine-cooling basins were filled with water, and their decoration often alludes to themes in which water plays an important part, in this case, Diana and her Nyphs bathing.
During this time, the potters of Urbino made extensive sets of matching table-wares for wealthy patrons. Francesco Durantino is known to have worked in Urbino before he ran his own workshop at Monte Bangnolo near Perugia. A similar basin in the Art Institute of Chicago, is fully signed and dated: "Francesco Durantino Vasaro a Monte Bagnolo di Peroscia 1553"

Physical description

Large oval basin, tin-glazed earthenware, painted in colours with scenes from the story of Diana and Callisto in a continuous landscape. Inside, amongst a group of nymphs bathing in a pool, Diana is seen discovering the pregnancy of Callisto; outside, Diana is again represented seated amongst her nymphs, and on the reverse side, the god Juno is seen transforming Callisto into a bear, her peacock standing on a rock nearby.

Place of Origin

Monte Bagnolo (made)

Date

mid 16th century (made)

Artist/maker

Durantino, Francesco (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Tin-glazed earthenware, painted in colours

Dimensions

Height: 26.0 cm, Length: 52.0 cm, Width: 41.5 cm

Object history note

Formerly in Soulages Collection

Historical context note

Large basins like this were used as cooling vessels for wine at the dinner table. In contemporary images, they are often situated on the floor, besides the table, with servants retrieve bottles of wine from them to serve to the diners. Wine-cooling basins were filled with water, and their decoration often alludes to themes in which water plays an important part, in this case, Diana and her Nyphs bathing.
During this time, the potters of Urbino made extensive sets of matching table-wares for wealthy patrons. Francesco Durantino is known to have worked in Urbino before he ran his own workshop at Monte Bangnolo near Perugia.

Descriptive line

Large oval basin, tin-glazed earthenware, painted in colours with scenes from the story of Diana and Callisto

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Vivian Scheidemantel, " An Italian Maiolica Wine-Cooler", Chicago, Museum Studies,/u>, No.3, 1968, publ. 1969.
Giovanni Conti, Cat. of the Bargello, 1971, no. 35
Wilson, T., 'The Maiolica-Painter Francesco Durantino: Mobility and Collaboration in Urbino "istoriato", in: Silvia Glaser (ed), Italienische Fayencen der Renaissance: Ihre Spuren in internationalen Museumssammlungen, Neuremberg (Germanischen Nationalmuseums) 2004, pp. 129-132

Production Note

See T.Wilson, Bibl.Ref.

Materials

Earthenware; Tin glaze

Techniques

Painted; Glazed

Categories

Ceramics; Maiolica; Eating

Collection

Ceramics Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.

  • Copyright: © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2017. All Rights Reserved