Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level E , Case MB6R, Shelf DA, Box 3

Vertical-horizontal number three

Photograph
1962-1963 (made), 1970s (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a photographic print of a computer-generated image originally created by A. Michael Noll at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey. Noll has explained that "The position of the end points of the lines was chosen at random with a uniform probability density. One of the coordinates was then changed alternately to create horizontal and vertical lines."


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Photography
Brief Description
Photographic print, 'Vertical-Horizontal Number Three', by A. Michael Noll, New Jersey, ca.1962
Physical Description
Photograph of a continuous and overlapping black line forming rectangles and squares on a white background.
Dimensions
  • Height: 28cm
  • Length: 21.8cm
Gallery Label
Chance and Control: Art in the Age of Computers (2018) A. MICHAEL NOLL (born 1939) Vertical-Horizontal Number Three USA, made 1962–63, printed 1970s At the suggestion of Bell Labs, Noll attempted to copyright some of his images a few years after he first produced them. The US copyright office initially refused his request, stating that random works could not be copyrighted. After Noll explained that the randomness was calculated by the program, his application was granted. Photographic print of a computer-generated image Given by the artist Museum no. E.36-2011(07/07/2018-18/11/2018)
Credit line
Gift of A. Michael Noll © AMN 1965
Summary
This is a photographic print of a computer-generated image originally created by A. Michael Noll at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey. Noll has explained that "The position of the end points of the lines was chosen at random with a uniform probability density. One of the coordinates was then changed alternately to create horizontal and vertical lines."

Collection
Accession Number
E.36-2011

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record createdMarch 28, 2011
Record URL