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High Chair

ca. 1890-1913 (manufactured)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This child's high chair was designed and manufactured by Philip Clissett, a chair maker based in the village of Bosbury, Herefordshire in the early 1900s. It was based on designs developed by the Clissett family, as well as the Evesham-based chair makers the Kelly family. It was designed during the Arts and Craft movement, an international design philosophy instigated by the artist and writer William Morris (1834-1896) and inspired by writer John Ruskin (1819-1900). This was an advocacy of traditional craftsmanship using folk styles, essentially anti-industrial in nature.

As a piece of furniture, the high chair is designed so that the seat is raised a distance from the ground, so that an adult may feed the seated child from a standing position, or so that the child can reach the table top.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Turned or planed ash and oak, morticed and varnished with rush weaved seat.
Brief Description
Child's high chair, ash rush seated, manufactured by Philip Clissett, Bosbury, ca. 1890-1913.
Physical Description
Low ladder back child's high arm chair. Ash, with curved back uprights joined by three graduated ladders, shaped and flattened at the top, and straight below. Turned front legs joined by two parallel stretchers, and oak footrest. Two side stretchers and curved arms.
Dimensions
  • Height: 83.5cm
  • Width: 40cm
  • Depth: 40cm
Style
Summary
This child's high chair was designed and manufactured by Philip Clissett, a chair maker based in the village of Bosbury, Herefordshire in the early 1900s. It was based on designs developed by the Clissett family, as well as the Evesham-based chair makers the Kelly family. It was designed during the Arts and Craft movement, an international design philosophy instigated by the artist and writer William Morris (1834-1896) and inspired by writer John Ruskin (1819-1900). This was an advocacy of traditional craftsmanship using folk styles, essentially anti-industrial in nature.



As a piece of furniture, the high chair is designed so that the seat is raised a distance from the ground, so that an adult may feed the seated child from a standing position, or so that the child can reach the table top.
Collection
Accession Number
B.226-2010

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record createdFebruary 1, 2011
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