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Fragment of green verditer paper

  • Object:

    Wallpaper

  • Place of origin:

    England (made)
    Burton Constable Hall (hung)

  • Date:

    late 18th century (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Paper coloured with green verditer pigment (precipitated hydrated copper carbonate), pasted on to hessian

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Dr David Connell, Burton Constable Foundation

  • Museum number:

    E.439-1999

  • Gallery location:

    Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C, case DW, shelf 34, box A

This paper comes from the Great Drawing Room at Burton Constable Hall (near Hull, in East Yorkshire). Large areas of verditer were discovered behind pier glasses in 1999 when the room was being treated for dry rot. The current wallcovering is a 19th century silk, applied over the verditer paper. The former is to be re-instated.

Blue and green verditer (also known as Bremen blue and Bremen green) are pigments derived from copper carbonate which were developed in the 18th century and were widely used in the late 18th, and 19th centuries for wallpapers. Both are impermanent and toxic.

Physical description

Fragment of green verditer paper with strips of buff paper attached on the back , all stuck to a piece of hessian. A series of nail holes along two edges of the hessian, and other holes tears etc along one edge of the verditer paper.

Place of Origin

England (made)
Burton Constable Hall (hung)

Date

late 18th century (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Paper coloured with green verditer pigment (precipitated hydrated copper carbonate), pasted on to hessian

Dimensions

Height: 30.5 cm irregular, lower edge torn and crumpled, Width: 21 cm uneven left-hand edge

Object history note

This paper comes from the Great Drawing Room at Burton Constable Hall. Large areas of verditer were discovered behind pier glasses in 1999 when the room was being treated for dry rot. The current wallcovering is a 19th century silk, applied over the verditer paper. The former is to be re-instated.

Historical context note

Blue and green verditer (also known as Bremen blue and Bremen green) originated in the 18th and were widely used in the late 18th, and 19th centuries for wallpapers. Both are impermanent and toxic.

Descriptive line

Fragment of green verditer paper from Burton Constable Hall. Late 18th century.

Materials

Paper; Green verditer; Burlap

Techniques

Painted

Categories

Wall coverings

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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