Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, room 405M , Case SR2, Shelf 5

It's a Long Way to Rome

Poster
April 1944 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Allied forces had landed in Southern Italy from Sicily in early September 1943. The difficult terrain and tenacious German defence slowed progress towards Rome. The poster claims that a snail travelling at 0.8 metres a minute for 191 days would have advanced 320 kilometres [actually 220] by 1 April 1944, whereas the Allies had achieved only 180 kilometres. However, after the German defence line and Monte Cassino were stormed in mid-May 1944, the Allies moved on rapidly to liberate Rome on June 5 1944. The style of this poster suggests it was probably designed by a French artist.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour lithograph
Brief Description
"It's a Long Way to Rome" Anonymous propaganda poster probably commissioned by the German forces occupying France. April, 1944. Colour lithograph.
Physical Description
Colour lithograph depicting a snail travelling the length of Italy.
Dimensions
  • Height: 159.6cm
  • Width: 120.7cm
Credit line
Gift of the American Friends of the V&A; Gift to the American Friends by Leslie, Judith and Gabri Schreyer and Alice Schreyer Batko
Subjects depicted
Places Depicted
Summary
Allied forces had landed in Southern Italy from Sicily in early September 1943. The difficult terrain and tenacious German defence slowed progress towards Rome. The poster claims that a snail travelling at 0.8 metres a minute for 191 days would have advanced 320 kilometres [actually 220] by 1 April 1944, whereas the Allies had achieved only 180 kilometres. However, after the German defence line and Monte Cassino were stormed in mid-May 1944, the Allies moved on rapidly to liberate Rome on June 5 1944. The style of this poster suggests it was probably designed by a French artist.
Other Number
LS.2567 - Leslie Schreyer Loan Number
Collection
Accession Number
E.1979-2004

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record createdNovember 3, 2005
Record URL