Pendant Cross

1809-1819 (made)
Pendant Cross thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91 to 93 mezzanine, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Crosses are the most distinctive element in French traditional jewellery. Every French woman had one. They usually wore them on a black velvet ribbon, fastened tightly round the neck like a choker, with a slide at the front. The ribbon passes through the bale of the cross, and is then threaded through a hole or loop at the base of the slide, and out at either side. The ribbon is tied in a bow at the back of the neck.

Normandy has the greatest variety of crosses, some so elaborate as to be almost unrecognisable. The croix de Saint-Lô, also called a croix quadrille from its lozenge shape, has a cast openwork frame decorated with five conical mounts set with rock crystals, with smaller stones set around them. It is the earliest of the characteristic Normandy crosses to have stones.

Croix de Saint-Lô were sometimes made of gold in the 18th century, but by the mid-19th century were only made of silver. They were usually worn with a matching circular slide. The slide on this cross has been replaced.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 3 parts.

  • Cross
  • Pendant
  • Clasp
Materials and Techniques
Silver set with crystals
Brief Description
Pendant cross of silver tracery (croix de Saint-Lô) set with rock crystals, Normandy (France), 1809-1819.
Physical Description
Stylised cross made from a lozenge-shaped sheet of silver, pierced in a floral design, and set with tiny faceted rock crystals, with four larger crystals, set in high conical mounts. A matching oval segment is hung from the lower edge of the main body to form the lower arm of the cross. The cross is hooked to an oval pierced slide, shaped like a stylised bow, which is also set with numerous small crystals, with a larger stone in the centre. It is similar to the cross, but does not match exactly. Two vertical bars on the back of the slide.
Subject depicted
Summary
Crosses are the most distinctive element in French traditional jewellery. Every French woman had one. They usually wore them on a black velvet ribbon, fastened tightly round the neck like a choker, with a slide at the front. The ribbon passes through the bale of the cross, and is then threaded through a hole or loop at the base of the slide, and out at either side. The ribbon is tied in a bow at the back of the neck.



Normandy has the greatest variety of crosses, some so elaborate as to be almost unrecognisable. The croix de Saint-Lô, also called a croix quadrille from its lozenge shape, has a cast openwork frame decorated with five conical mounts set with rock crystals, with smaller stones set around them. It is the earliest of the characteristic Normandy crosses to have stones.



Croix de Saint-Lô were sometimes made of gold in the 18th century, but by the mid-19th century were only made of silver. They were usually worn with a matching circular slide. The slide on this cross has been replaced.
Collection
Accession Number
70:1 to 3-1869

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record createdNovember 1, 2005
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