Not currently on display at the V&A

George Jackson is dead, Grosvenor Square

Photograph
08/1971 (photographed), 2010 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Having moved to London from Jamaica in the early 1960s, photographer Dennis Morris went on to document the mounting black consciousness and political activism in Britain during the 1970s. His personal photographs, since published together as the series Growing Up Black, include depictions of historic events relating to international racial politics. Morris felt the demonstrations in London following the controversial death of the African American prisoner and activist, George Jackson (1941-1971) were a key contributor to the ‘feeling of black consciousness’ at the time. They also reflect the wide ranging support for Jackson as a black political figure; continuing his challenge to racial injustice.

The V&A acquired ten photographs by Dennis Morris as part of the Staying Power project. Staying Power is a five year partnership between the V&A and Black Cultural Archives. The project aims to explore black British experience from the 1950s to the 1990s through photographs acquired by the V&A and oral histories conducted by Black Cultural Archives.
read Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience Working in partnership with Black Cultural Archives, we identified and acquired photographs taken by black photographers, or which document the lives of black people in Britain, taken between the 1950s – 90s.
object details
Categories
Object Type
Additional TitleGrowing Up Black (series title)
Materials and Techniques
Gelatin silver print
Brief Description
Photograph by Dennis Morris, 'George Jackson is dead, Grosvenor Square', from the series Growing Up Black, gelatin silver print, London, 1971, printed 2010
Physical Description
Black and white photograph of a group of protesters holding up placards outside in front of a group of policemen. A line of police stand to the right of the image, while protesters stand in a group on the left. One protester in the centre of the image appears to be talking to the police, while a man in a suit to the right of him looks directly out of the frame. One of the placards has a photograph of a man on it, while another bears the text 'GEORGE JACKSON MURDERED'. There is a film camera in the crowd and various other placards and banners.
Dimensions
  • Image size height: 45.5cm
  • Image size width: 68.3cm
  • Paper size height: 66.0cm
  • Paper size width: 83.8cm
  • Mount size height: 68.0cm
  • Mount size width: 92.0cm
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
(signed and titled on the reverse)
Credit line
Supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.
Object history
The V&A acquired this photograph as part of the Staying Power project. Staying Power is a five year partnership between the V&A and Black Cultural Archives. The project aims to explore black British experience from the 1950s to the 1990s through photographs acquired by the V&A and oral histories conducted by Black Cultural Archives.
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Associations
Summary
Having moved to London from Jamaica in the early 1960s, photographer Dennis Morris went on to document the mounting black consciousness and political activism in Britain during the 1970s. His personal photographs, since published together as the series Growing Up Black, include depictions of historic events relating to international racial politics. Morris felt the demonstrations in London following the controversial death of the African American prisoner and activist, George Jackson (1941-1971) were a key contributor to the ‘feeling of black consciousness’ at the time. They also reflect the wide ranging support for Jackson as a black political figure; continuing his challenge to racial injustice.



The V&A acquired ten photographs by Dennis Morris as part of the Staying Power project. Staying Power is a five year partnership between the V&A and Black Cultural Archives. The project aims to explore black British experience from the 1950s to the 1990s through photographs acquired by the V&A and oral histories conducted by Black Cultural Archives.
Associated Objects
Bibliographic Reference
Morris, D. Growing Up Black (London: Autograph ABP, 2012), illustrated
Collection
Accession Number
E.1487-2010

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record createdFebruary 1, 2011
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