Not currently on display at the V&A

La Ligne H

Toile
1954 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The traditional focus of couture was the creation of high fashion garments for private clients. However, sales to department stores and wholesalers became increasingly important after the war. Buyers purchased fabric toiles such as this, paper patterns, or even original models which they copied.

Christian Dior (1905-57) was a shrewd businessman and one of the first couturiers to establish international licensing and reproduction contracts with other companies.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Toile
  • Packaging
Materials and Techniques
Calico, printed paper
Brief Description
Calico skirt in toile 'La Ligne H' and its packaging, Christian Dior, Paris, 1954
Physical Description
Calico skirt in toile and its packaging.



The skirt is straight cut with a pleat at the centre back hem. The waist band is hollowed out and fastens at either side with two hooks and eyes. There seems to be no provision for closing the plaquets. There are two loops for hanging the garment up at the centre front and back. To the waist, at the centre front, is stitched a tape lapel on which is written a '50680 Messrs. Gouband toile jupe ajax'. With an envelope in white thick paper printed with a label of Christian Dior.
Dimensions
  • Length: 810mm (Note: skirt)
  • Circumference: 560 (Note: Waist)
  • Height: 311mm (Note: Packaging)
  • Width: 375mm (Note: Packaging)
Production typePrototype
Gallery Label
[C panel – 4i] READY-TO-WEAR The traditional focus of couture was the creation of high fashion garments for private clients. However, sales to department stores and wholesalers became increasingly important after the war. Buyers purchased fabric toiles and paper patterns, or even original models. These designs could only be copied a limited number of times. Some designers created ready-to-wear collections specifically for the export market, using the mass-production and sizing methods developed in the USA. By 1948, a year after launching his house, Dior opened on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue. ‘The dresses will designed with one eye on US tastes and the other on the limitations of machine production,’ wrote Time magazine on 16 August 1948. [110 words] [group label] Toiles Canvas toiles were created as prototypes for original designs before they were made up in expensive fabrics. They were also made for the sale of designs to manufacturers. 1. Contract for reproduction rights for a model to be provided in fabric or as a canvas pattern Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne August 1954 V&A: Archive of Art and Design 2. Calico toile with label - pattern for a fur collar Christian Dior (1905-57) 1950s V&A: unregistered collection 3. Calico toile with label - pattern for a fur bolero jacket Christian Dior (1905-57) 1950s V&A: unregistered collection 4. Calico toile with packaging - pattern for a skirt Christian Dior (1905-57) 1954 Given by B. Neville V&A: T.225-1962 5. Calico toile with pencil markings - pattern for a mink stole 1950s V&A: unregistered collection(22/09/2007)
Credit line
Given by B. Neville
Object history
Mr Neville (donor) said that this was bought by a firm of wholesalers for which he worked in 1954, and was typical of the fashions of that year.



1954 was the year of Dior's H-Line, also known as 'the runner bean' line for its straight, flat silhouette. This skirt, although not couture, reflects that same linear cut.
Production
Attribution note: Pattern for licensed copying
Summary
The traditional focus of couture was the creation of high fashion garments for private clients. However, sales to department stores and wholesalers became increasingly important after the war. Buyers purchased fabric toiles such as this, paper patterns, or even original models which they copied.



Christian Dior (1905-57) was a shrewd businessman and one of the first couturiers to establish international licensing and reproduction contracts with other companies.
Collection
Accession Number
T.225&A-1962

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record createdOctober 17, 2005
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