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Saint Paul

  • Object:

    Panel

  • Place of origin:

    Netherlands (possibly, made)
    England (possibly, made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1680 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Enamel paints and silver stain on clear glass

  • Museum number:

    C.61-1937

  • Gallery location:

    Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries, case S3

The life of St Paul is recorded in the New Testament in the Acts of the Apostles. His teachings were instrumental in the development of the early Christian church. Although he was not one of the original Apostles, Paul was later included among them

Paul’s real name was ‘Saul’. He had been an active and vicious opponent of the early Christian faith. In Acts he is recorded as approving the killing of St Stephen, the first Christian martyr, who was stoned to death.

On one of his missions to persecute the Christians, Saul was travelling by road to the city of Damascus. He was blinded by a brilliant blaze of light and God spoke to him, saying ‘Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?’. Saul’s companions took him to Damascus, where his blindness was cured and he was converted to Christianity. He took the name ‘Paul’ at this point. This event is seen in the background of the panel, and Paul gestures towards it.

The style of the painting suggests that it was done by a Netherlandish artist. However, many artists from the Netherlands were working in England in the 17th century and their work influenced that of English glass painters.

Place of Origin

Netherlands (possibly, made)
England (possibly, made)

Date

ca. 1680 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Enamel paints and silver stain on clear glass

Marks and inscriptions

'Savle Savle Quid Me Perseq[u]eris'
Saul Saul why do you persecute me

Dimensions

Height: 25.0 cm framed, Width: 19.7 cm framed, Depth: 3.2 cm framed, Height: 23.5 cm sight, Width: 18.2 cm sight, Weight: 1.10 kg framed

Object history note

Formerly at Donnington Grove, near Newbury, Berkshire.

Historical context note

The life of St. Paul is recorded in the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament. Paul's teachings were instrumental in the development of the early Christian Church. Although he wasn't one of the original Twelve Apostles, Paul was later included amongst them

Paul's real name was 'Saul'. He was an active and vicious opponent of the early Christian faith. In Acts he is recorded as being amongst the crowd that condemned St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr, who was then stoned to death.

On one of his missions to persecute the Christians, Saul was travelling by road to the city of Damascus. He was blinded by a brilliant blaze of light and God spoke to him saying; 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?'. Saul's aids took him on to Damascus where his blindness was cured and he was converted to Christianity. He took the name 'Paul' at this point. This event is seen in the background of the panel and Paul gestures towards it.

The style of the painting would suggest that it was painted by a Netherlandish artist. However, many artists from the Netherlands were working in England in the 17th century and their work influenced that of English glass-painters.

Descriptive line

Panel of clear glass painted with enamels and yellow (silver) stain. Depicting a figure of St. Paul. Netherlands or English, ca.1680.

Labels and date

SAINT PAUL

In the background is shown the Conversion of Saul on his way to Damascus, with the words of God: SAVLE SAVLE QVID ME PERSEQERIS ('Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?').

Netherlands or England, probably about 1680
Museum no. C.61-1937 [(PW) 2003]

Materials

Glass

Techniques

Painting; Silver staining

Categories

Stained Glass; Religion; Christianity; British Galleries

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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