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Not currently on display at the V&A

Dress

1827-1829 (made), ca. 1770-1780 (woven)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

A striped eighteenth-century silk gives this dress a vibrant quality. Women's clothes were often made from earlier fabrics, particularly when the colours, pattern and texture suited the fashions of the day. Eighteenth century taffetas were popular during the 1820s and 1830s as these crisp silks helped the skirts stand away from the body in graceful folds and the sleeves billow into elegant puffs. The delicate floral designs, woven stripes and soft colours also complemented contemporary lines in dress.

This evening gown is made from silk tobine dating from the 1770s. Silk tobines were taffetas patterned by being woven with an extra warp floating on the surface that was bound at intervals with silk weft threads. The warp here is in shades of red and the pattern it creates helps break up the uniformity of the stripes. This fabric was probably selected because, from a distance, the yellow, pink and red stripes resemble the 'rainbow style' prints introduced in the 1820s. 'Rainbow style' was a method of block-printing invented by the paper-stainer Spoerlin of Vienna. It was the first block-printed style adapted for roller-printing, as after the colours were applied to the cloth they were merged at the edges using a brush or roller. The result was a soft blending of colours evoking the effects of a rainbow.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Brocaded silk tobine, trimmed with silk satin, lined with glazed cotton
Brief Description
Dress made of brocaded silk tobine trimmed with silk satin, fabric woven ca. 1770-1780, made in Great Britain, 1827-1829
Physical Description
Evening dress made of brocaded silk tobine trimmed with silk satin and lined with cotton. Made from warp striped tobine in yellow cream and green with red warp patterns. The neck is low and oval, and the high waisted bodice is gauged in the centre front. The sleeves are short and full puffed, covered with lobed epaulets. The skirt is gathered to the bodice, and the gauging is slightly tighter at the centre back. Just below knee level is a wide band of gathered trimming, of matching material headed by a pleated band of green satin, and the lobed edges are bound with the same. Green satin is used to bind the neck, edge the epaulets and pipe the bodice seams. The dress fastens at the centre back with a false fastening of small self covered buttons, and the actual fastening was probably hook and eyes. The existing fastenings are replacements. There is a calico waistband on which are traces of a blue stamped trade mark, and the garment is lined with glazed cotton.
Credit line
Given by Miss C. Granger-Evans
Summary
A striped eighteenth-century silk gives this dress a vibrant quality. Women's clothes were often made from earlier fabrics, particularly when the colours, pattern and texture suited the fashions of the day. Eighteenth century taffetas were popular during the 1820s and 1830s as these crisp silks helped the skirts stand away from the body in graceful folds and the sleeves billow into elegant puffs. The delicate floral designs, woven stripes and soft colours also complemented contemporary lines in dress.



This evening gown is made from silk tobine dating from the 1770s. Silk tobines were taffetas patterned by being woven with an extra warp floating on the surface that was bound at intervals with silk weft threads. The warp here is in shades of red and the pattern it creates helps break up the uniformity of the stripes. This fabric was probably selected because, from a distance, the yellow, pink and red stripes resemble the 'rainbow style' prints introduced in the 1820s. 'Rainbow style' was a method of block-printing invented by the paper-stainer Spoerlin of Vienna. It was the first block-printed style adapted for roller-printing, as after the colours were applied to the cloth they were merged at the edges using a brush or roller. The result was a soft blending of colours evoking the effects of a rainbow.
Collection
Accession Number
T.1-1967

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record createdSeptember 9, 2005
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