Tiara

ca.1850 (made)
Tiara thumbnail 1
Tiara thumbnail 2
+9
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Wreaths of flowers and foliage were in fashion throughout the 19th century. Sometimes they included real flowers, or artificial ones made of fabric, wax or porcelain. Here the flowers and foliage consist of diamonds and pearls. At Queen Victoria’s coronation, her attendants wore wreaths of silver corn-ears.

Naturalistic jewellery, decorated with clearly recognisable flowers and fruit, was popular for much of this period. These motifs first became fashionable in the early years of the century, with the widespread interest in botany and the influence of Romantic poets such as Wordsworth. By the 1850s the delicate early designs had given way to more extravagant and complex compositions of flowers and foliage.

At the same time, flowers were used to express love and friendship. The colours in nature were matched by coloured gemstones, and a ‘language of flowers’ spelt out special messages.

In contrast with earlier periods, the more elaborate jewellery was worn almost exclusively by women.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Brilliant- and rose-cut diamonds set in silver, gold
Brief Description
Tiara in the form of a wreath, brilliant and rose-cut diamonds with pearls set in silver, backed in gold, England, about 1850
Physical Description
Tiara in the form of a wreath, brilliant-cut diamonds with a few rose-cut specimens in three attached units, set in silver and backed with gold. The basic structure is a wreath of Neoclassical design. The honeysuckle palmette on a trembler a later addition of 1860–80, replacing a damaged flower
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.1cm
  • Width: 19cm
  • Depth: 3cm
Credit line
Cory Bequest
Subjects depicted
Summary
Wreaths of flowers and foliage were in fashion throughout the 19th century. Sometimes they included real flowers, or artificial ones made of fabric, wax or porcelain. Here the flowers and foliage consist of diamonds and pearls. At Queen Victoria’s coronation, her attendants wore wreaths of silver corn-ears.



Naturalistic jewellery, decorated with clearly recognisable flowers and fruit, was popular for much of this period. These motifs first became fashionable in the early years of the century, with the widespread interest in botany and the influence of Romantic poets such as Wordsworth. By the 1850s the delicate early designs had given way to more extravagant and complex compositions of flowers and foliage.



At the same time, flowers were used to express love and friendship. The colours in nature were matched by coloured gemstones, and a ‘language of flowers’ spelt out special messages.



In contrast with earlier periods, the more elaborate jewellery was worn almost exclusively by women.
Collection
Accession Number
M.117-1951

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record createdAugust 17, 2005
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