Dress

1810 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Ivory coloured silks billow out in four openings at the top of the sleeves of this dress. The puffed trimmings are inspired by the fashionable slashing of garments in the Renaissance period when the top fabric was cut to reveal a coloured lining or garment worn underneath. Here, a long rectangular strip of ivory silk is stitched to the inside of the sleeve head and the excess gathered into puffs through the openings. The 19th-century version of slashing is much more controlled by cut, stitching and piped edges, rather than the raw cuts in fabric seen in the 16th century.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Plain woven silk, silk crêpe and silk satin
Brief Description
Bright yellow dress with ivory silk trimmings; 'slashed' sleeves and vandyked hem.
Physical Description
High-waisted dress of yellow silk, with ivory coloured silks billows out in four openings at the top of the sleeves; a long rectangular strip of ivory silk is stitched to the inside of the sleeve head and the excess gathered into pudds through the openings. Long sleeves narrow at wrists with double bands at the cuffs and trimmed with ivory silk satin frills, yellow silk crêpe, cream ribbon and cording. Trimming around lower hem of skirt of applied vandyked border of ivory silk.
Dimensions
  • Length centre back neckline to hem of train length: 158cm
  • Front length shoulder to hem length: 139cm
Credit line
Given by Sydney Vacher
Summary
Ivory coloured silks billow out in four openings at the top of the sleeves of this dress. The puffed trimmings are inspired by the fashionable slashing of garments in the Renaissance period when the top fabric was cut to reveal a coloured lining or garment worn underneath. Here, a long rectangular strip of ivory silk is stitched to the inside of the sleeve head and the excess gathered into puffs through the openings. The 19th-century version of slashing is much more controlled by cut, stitching and piped edges, rather than the raw cuts in fabric seen in the 16th century.
Collection
Accession Number
T.8-1918

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record createdJuly 29, 2005
Record URL