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Greetings card

  • Place of origin:

    Germany (published)

  • Date:

    1860-1880 (published)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Colour lithograph and paper lace

  • Credit Line:

    Bequeathed by Guy Little

  • Museum number:

    E.2329-1953

  • Gallery location:

    Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C, case GG, shelf 68, box G

This German greetings card from about 1850–75 shows a female figure as a rose. Roses have traditionally symbolised love, and red roses, in particular, unity. The rose, like the lily, is also associated with the Virgin Mary. The nineteenth century created a complete and now almost forgotten ‘language of flowers’, in which every plant had a distinct character and sentimental meaning.

Physical description

Colour-printed greetings card, showing a flower in human form, with embossed paper lace edging.

Place of Origin

Germany (published)

Date

1860-1880 (published)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Colour lithograph and paper lace

Marks and inscriptions

Die Rose

Dimensions

Height: 11.5 cm highest point, Width: 7.8 cm widest point

Object history note

Some flowers can have a symbolic meaning, like the lily and the rose which are both associated with the Virgin Mary. The nineteenth century created a complete and now almost forgotten 'language of flowers' in which every plant had a distinct character and sentimental meaning. Here the plants have actually become people.

Descriptive line

One of nine greeting cards with anthropomorphised flower designs, Germany, 1860-1880

Labels and date

NINE PRINTED CARDS
German, about 1850-75
Colour-printed card with embossed paper lace

Some flowers can have a symbolic meaning, like the lily and the rose which are both associated with the Virgin Mary. The nineteenth century created a complete and now almost forgotten 'language of flowers', in which every plant had a distinct character and sentimental meaning. Here, the plants have actually become people.

E.2327, 2329-32, 2334, 2336, 2337, 2342 - 1953 []

Materials

Lithographic ink; Card; Paper lace

Techniques

Colour lithography

Subjects depicted

Lace; Flowers

Categories

Greeting cards; Anthropomorphism; Ephemera; Prints; Lace

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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