Portrait of the Goldsmith Louis Roupert thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level D , Case EO, Shelf 38

Portrait of the Goldsmith Louis Roupert

Print
1668 (published)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This engraving by Louis Coquin (also known as Cossin), after Pierre Rabon, was published, in Paris, in 1668. The goldsmith Louis Roupert is shown next to a vase of acanthus leaves holding a sheet with acanthus decoration on it. These, and the tools on the table next to him, suggest that he is a goldsmith.

The rolling acanthus was a popular motif in ancient Rome, and was much copied by Renaissance artists. The use of the scrolling acanthus leaf was an essential part of the goldsmith’s skill from about the mid 17th century to the end of the 18th century. Ornament prints like these were copied by artisans working in different fields, and were responsible for spreading the influence of various decorative styles.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraving on paper
Brief Description
Portrait of the goldsmith Louis Roupert, engraving by Louis Cossin, [Coquin] after Pierre Rabon, France, 1668
Physical Description
Print, portrait of the goldsmith Louis Roupert, engraving after Pierre Rabon.
Dimensions
  • Height: 16.5cm
  • Width: 22.8cm
Gallery Label
PRINT: PORTRAIT OF THE GOLDSMITH LOUIS ROUPERT French, 1668 Engraving by Louis Coquin after Pierre Rabon, published in Paris 28787 From about 1650 to 1800 the use of the scrolling acanthus leaf was an essential part of the goldsmith's skill. Here Roupert shows off silver leaves in a bottle and a sheet of ornament. The horse, a goldsmith's pattern, is entirely made of leaves.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This engraving by Louis Coquin (also known as Cossin), after Pierre Rabon, was published, in Paris, in 1668. The goldsmith Louis Roupert is shown next to a vase of acanthus leaves holding a sheet with acanthus decoration on it. These, and the tools on the table next to him, suggest that he is a goldsmith.



The rolling acanthus was a popular motif in ancient Rome, and was much copied by Renaissance artists. The use of the scrolling acanthus leaf was an essential part of the goldsmith’s skill from about the mid 17th century to the end of the 18th century. Ornament prints like these were copied by artisans working in different fields, and were responsible for spreading the influence of various decorative styles.
Collection
Accession Number
28787

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record createdJuly 15, 2005
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