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Model
  • Model
    Fouquet, Jean-Pierre, born 1752 - died 1829
  • Enlarge image

Model

  • Place of origin:

    France (made)

  • Date:

    ca.1820 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Fouquet, Jean-Pierre, born 1752 - died 1829 (maker)
    Fouquet, François, born 1787 - died 1870 (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Plaster of Paris with metal armature

  • Museum number:

    CIRC.217-1916

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

This model of a tomb at Palmyra, was probably made by Jean Pierre Fouquet and François Fouquet in Paris in about 1820.

The choice of a classical order sets the character of a building. The fronts of ancient temples were given porticoes made of columns topped by triangular pediments. Architects since antiquity have studied importnat classical prototypes. This tomb in the shape of a temple is one of a series of models of Greek and Roman architecture shown by the architect John Nash in the Gallery of Architecture at his house in Regent Street. Visitors were clearly meant to link the great buildings of the past with Nash's own improvements to London. By 1858 Nash's models were being shown at South Kensington, eventually joining the Museum of Construction. The main source for this model was Robert Wood's illustration in The Ruins of Palmyra, published in 1753.

Physical description

Model of a tomb at Palmyra, Plaster of Paris with metal armature, portico made up of columns decorated front and back, topped by flat triangular pediment.

Place of Origin

France (made)

Date

ca.1820 (made)

Artist/maker

Fouquet, Jean-Pierre, born 1752 - died 1829 (maker)
Fouquet, François, born 1787 - died 1870 (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Plaster of Paris with metal armature

Object history note

The choice of a classical order sets the character of the building to which it is applied. For the fronts of temples in antiquity, porticoes made up of columns decorated front and back, topped by the flat triangular shape known as the pediment. Architects since antiquity have studied important classical prototypes for their own designs. This tomb in the shape of a temple is one of a series of models of Greek and Roman architecture ordered in Paris about 1820 by the architect John Nash for display in his Gallery of Architecture at 14-16 Regent Street. The Gallery was part of the public rooms of Nash's house. Visitors were clearly meant to reflect upon the influence of the great buildings of the past on Nash's own improvements to the urban fabric of London. By 1858 Nash's models were being shown at South Kensington, eventually joining the Museum of Construction. The main source for this model was Robert Wood's illustration in the The Ruin of Palmyra, published in 1753.

Descriptive line

Model of a tomb at Tudmur (Palmyra), Plaster of Paris with metal armature, probably made by Jean Pierre and François Fouquet of Paris.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Leslie, Fiona. Inside Outside: Changing Attitude towards Architectural Models in the Museums at South Kensington. Architectural History. 47, 2004. pp. 159-200.
Kimbell, F. The Capital of Virginia: a Landmark of American Architecture. Richmond: Virginia State Library and Archive, 2002. fg. 57 on p. 53.

Subjects depicted

Building; Architecture; Tombs; Portico; Columns; Classicism; Pediment; Architectural orders

Categories

Architecture; Death

Collection

Sculpture Collection

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