Panel thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Panel

late 15th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This alabaster panel depicts the Annunciation. Alabaster, a fine grained form of gypsum, is a smooth marble-like stone that became popular during the late Middle Ages for the carving of religious sculpture. Softer than marble, it was much easier to carve and also considerably cheaper. England was an important European centre of alabaster production, mostly quarried in Tutbury and Chellaston near Nottingham. From about 1380s, alabasters - both single devotional images and reliefs for altarpieces - were exported in considerable numbers to the continent where they were to survive, whereas in England such images were destroyed during the Reformation.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
carved and painted alabaster with gesso
Brief Description
Alabaster panel depicting the Annunciation, with traces of the original paint still evident, England, late 15th century
Physical Description
Alabaster panel depicting the Annunciation, with traces of the original paint still evident, including the green background and daisy pattern used in various workshops and on manuscripts of the period. The decorative gesso knobs remain intact. The Virgin Mary kneel at the bottom right with an open book in front of her. She turns to look at the archangel Gabriel carrying a scroll. God is depicted crowned and haloed with the dove issuing from his mouth. An angel stands in the top centre of the panel playing a lute.
Dimensions
  • Height: 42.9cm
  • Width: 29cm
Credit line
Given by Dr. W L Hildburgh
Subjects depicted
Summary
This alabaster panel depicts the Annunciation. Alabaster, a fine grained form of gypsum, is a smooth marble-like stone that became popular during the late Middle Ages for the carving of religious sculpture. Softer than marble, it was much easier to carve and also considerably cheaper. England was an important European centre of alabaster production, mostly quarried in Tutbury and Chellaston near Nottingham. From about 1380s, alabasters - both single devotional images and reliefs for altarpieces - were exported in considerable numbers to the continent where they were to survive, whereas in England such images were destroyed during the Reformation.
Bibliographic References
  • Lindley, Philip, 'Leeds Medieval painted sculpture' Burlington Magazine, December 2002, CXLIV, np. 1197, fig. 62.
  • Boldrick, Stacy, <i>Wonder: Painted Sculpture from Medieval England</i>, Leeds, Henry Morre Institute, 2002
Collection
Accession Number
A.91-1946

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record createdApril 20, 2005
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