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Print

  • Date:

    1919 (printed)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Printed paper

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Richard Buckle

  • Museum number:

    S.199-2008

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Kikimora is a female house-spirit in Slavic mythology who is the embodiment of wickedness. She is a witch-like figure and traditionally lives behind the stove.

Kikimora was the first of the Russian folk tales choreographed by Leonide Massine to music by Liadoff with designs by Larionov. It was first performed as an independent ballet at San Sebastian in Spain on 25 August 1916 and then expanded with the addition of two other stories at the Theatre du Chatelet, Paris, 11 May 1917

Physical description

Print showing make-up design for Kikimora in brown and blue, half the face is painted blue, the hair is swept up with a comb. The woman's arms are held up and there is a suggestion that she is wearing a floral frock.

Date

1919 (printed)

Materials and Techniques

Printed paper

Dimensions

Height: 33.4 cm, Width: 24 cm

Object history note

The print comes from Gontcharova, Larionov L'Art Décoratif Théâtral Moderne (1919).

Descriptive line

Design for Kikimora's makeup by Larionov for the ballet Children's Tales (Contes Russes), 1919

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Gontcharova, Larionov L'Art Décoratif Théâtral Moderne. Paris: La Cible, 1919

Categories

Entertainment & Leisure; Prints

Collection

Theatre and Performance Collection

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