Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Chalice and paten

Chalice and paten

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    1753-1754 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    White, Fuller (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Silver-gilt, raised and engraved

  • Credit Line:

    Lent by the Coram Family in the care of the Foundling Museum

  • Museum number:

    LOAN:FOUNDLING MUSEUM.1:2-2005

  • Gallery location:

    Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries, case 2C []

The chalice, paten and alms dish were used during Holy Communion to serve the consecrated wine and bread and to collect donations.

They were an anonymous gift to the Foundling Hospital in London. The chalice is engraved with the hospital’s coat of arms, designed by William Hogarth, in which Nature and Britannia support a shield with a foundling. Its motto is ‘Help’. The paten bears the crest of a lamb with an olive branch.

The Foundling Hospital was started by Captain Thomas Coram in 1746 to provide a home and education for orphans and abandoned babies. The governors wanted the children to be instructed in the ‘Principles of Religion and Morality’ and to go to church on Sundays. They were also to be reminded of the ‘lowness of their Condition, that they may early imbibe the Principles of Humility and Gratitude to their Benefactors’.

Physical description

Communion cup and paten lid

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

1753-1754 (made)

Artist/maker

White, Fuller (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Silver-gilt, raised and engraved

Marks and inscriptions

The chalice is engraved with a coat of arms Parted per fess, Azure and Vert, a Young Child lying naked and exposed, extending it's right hand proper. In Chief Argent between two Mullets of six points Or; And for a Crest on a Wreath of the Colours, a Lamb Argent, holding in it's mouth a Sprig of Thyme proper; Supported on the Dexter side by a Terminal Figure of a Woman full of Nipples proper, with a Mantle Vert, the Term Argent being the Emblem of Nature; And on the Sinister side The Emblem of Liberty, Represented by Britannia holding in her right hand, upon a Staff proper, a Cap Argent, and habited in a Vest Azure, girt with a Belt Or, the under Garment Gules' and the motto 'HELP'. The paten bears the crest of a lamb with an olive branch in its mouth.
The coat of arms was designed for the Foundling Hospital by William Hogarth. It shows female figures representing Nature and Britannia supporting a foundling in a shield between two stars and a crescent with the motto 'HELP'.
The Governors petitioned for a grant of arms for the Foundling Hospital on 28th January 1746.
The original sketch for the hospital arms by William Hogarth remains in the possession of The Foundling Hospital.

London hallmarks for 1753-4

Mark of Fuller White

Dimensions

Height: 22.4 cm chalice, Diameter: 12.7 cm paten

Object history note

The chapel silver which consisted of a pair of chalices and patens and an almsdish was given by an anonymous gentleman.

Historical significance: The Chapel silver from the Foundling Hospital is engraved with the coat of arms which was devised for the hospital by William Hogarth.

Historical context note

Gifts to Charity
Public benefactions were seen as evidence of the donor’s faith. In 18th-century London, leading citizens founded institutions to assist the poor, sick and isolated. Prevention was better than a cure, and in 1758 the Asylum for Female Orphans was founded to prevent prostitution. In the same year the Magdalen Hospital was established to reform repentant prostitutes.

Hospital governors recognised the importance of religion in educating and nurturing those for whom they cared. Regular communion was considered part of the healing process. In poorhouses parish officers saw that communion was celebrated and prayer books distributed.

The Foundling Hospital was founded by Captain Thomas Coram in 1746 to provide a home and education for orphans and abandoned babies. The Hospital Governors wanted the children to be 'early instructed in the Principles of Religion and Morality'. They erected a Chapel adjoining the Hospital in Lamb's Conduit Fields as there was no place of public worship to which the Children and Servants of the Hospital could conveniently resort. The Governors resolved that thechildren 'do constantly attend Divine Service in the Chapel on Sundays & that the officers of the Hospital do often remind them of the lowness of their Condition, that they may early imbibe the Principles of Humility and Gratitude to their Benefactors'. The chapel opened in 1753 with a special performance of music by the composer George Frederick Handel.

Descriptive line

A silver-gilt chalice and paten presented to the chapel of the Foundling Hospital, London by an anonymous gentleman and supplied by the London goldsmith Fuller White in 1753-4.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Nichols & Wray, History of the Foundling Hospital, 1935,pp.250-1

Labels and date

Foundling Hospital Chalice, Paten and Alms Dish

The chalice, paten and alms dish were used during Holy Communion to serve the consecrated wine and bread and to collect donations.

They were an anonymous gift to the Foundling Hospital in London. The chalice is engraved with the hospital’s coat of arms, designed by William Hogarth, in which Nature and Britannia support a shield with a foundling. Its motto is ‘Help’. The paten bears the crest of a lamb with an olive branch.

The Foundling Hospital was started by Captain Thomas Coram in 1746 to provide a home and education for orphans and abandoned babies. The governors wanted the children to be instructed in the ‘Principles of Religion and Morality’ and to go to church on Sundays. They were also to be reminded of the ‘lowness of their Condition, that they may early imbibe the Principles of Humility and Gratitude to their Benefactors’.

London, England, 1753–4; by Fuller White
(active 1734–75). Silver gilt
Lent by the Coram Family in the care of the Foundling Museum [22/11/2005]

Materials

Silver-gilt

Techniques

Engraving; Raising

Categories

Religion; Metalwork; Christianity

Collection

Metalwork Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.