Pin Cushion thumbnail 1
Pin Cushion thumbnail 2
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Not currently on display at the V&A

Pin Cushion

18th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This little pincushion was hand-knitted from silk in two sections in stocking stitch and joined at the seams. The name 'C. Osboldeston' appears in the centre of the design between two flowers. The owner would have attached it to her waist with the loop of braid.

The Industrial Revolution in Britain in the 18th century introduced mass production using machines. It transformed knitting, as it did many other handicrafts, into an automated process. Hand-knitters found it increasingly difficult to earn a living and knitting started to become a leisure pursuit.


Object details
Category
Object type
Materials and techniques
Hand knitted silk
Brief description
Pin cushion, hand knitted silk, English, 18th century
Physical description
Round pincushion knitted in stocking stitch from silk. The name 'C. Osboldeston' forms part of the design, along with floral motifs. There is a length of braid attached to the pincushion.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 2.5in
Tension: 28 stitches per inch 10 stitches per cm
Gallery label
6. SMALL PINCUSHIONS Hand-knitted silk and wool English, late 18th to early 19th century. Each is made of two circles, approximately 4cms in diameter, of patterned stocking stitch. Plaited and woven braids hide the stitches that join the two halves together and are made into loops so that the pincushions could be suspended from the waist. Given by the Reverend R Brooke, 545-1864, and the descendants of Hannah Downes, T.31F&G and T.66-1970(1985)
Credit line
Given by the Rev. R. Brooke and the descendants of Hannah Downs
Summary
This little pincushion was hand-knitted from silk in two sections in stocking stitch and joined at the seams. The name 'C. Osboldeston' appears in the centre of the design between two flowers. The owner would have attached it to her waist with the loop of braid.



The Industrial Revolution in Britain in the 18th century introduced mass production using machines. It transformed knitting, as it did many other handicrafts, into an automated process. Hand-knitters found it increasingly difficult to earn a living and knitting started to become a leisure pursuit.
Bibliographic reference
Hinchcliffe, Frances (ed.), Knit One, Purl One : Historic and Contemporary Knitting from the V&A's Collection. V&A, London, 1985p.12
Collection
Accession number
545-1864

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Record createdJanuary 5, 2005
Record URL
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