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Consecration plate - The Hague plate

The Hague plate

  • Object:

    Consecration plate

  • Place of origin:

    The Hague (made)

  • Date:

    1685 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    van der Hegge, Pieter (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Silver, engraved

  • Museum number:

    M.8-1995

  • Gallery location:

    Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries, case 2A

One of a set of three, this large dish carried the communion bread to the altar for consecration. It was part of an impressively austere service given to the English Reformed Church in The Hague between 1673 and 1711 by different members of the congregation. The donors were Jan van der Hayden, a lawyer from Gouda, and Jacob Havius, both elders of the church. One of the dishes bears van der Hayden’s coat of arms.

Physical description

A plain broad dish with a central well engraved with a coat of arms and a latin inscription recording the name of the donor

Place of Origin

The Hague (made)

Date

1685 (made)

Artist/maker

van der Hegge, Pieter (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Silver, engraved

Marks and inscriptions

Stamped with the following marks: date letter L for 1685, stork for The Hague; the lion rampant for The Netherlands, and the maker's mark for Pieter van der Hegge

Inscribed 'Studio et opera Johannis van der Hayden De Gouda Iruis Consulti'.

Dimensions

Height: 2.20 cm, Diameter: 35.80 cm, Weight: 1076.2 g, Weight: 34.6 troy

Object history note

Part of a set of church plate given to the English Reformed Church in The Hague between 1673 and 1711 by different members of the congregation and made by four different local goldsmiths. After the church closed in 1822, the plate was used by the chaplain of the British Embassy in The Hague. It was transferred to the V&A in 1929.

Historical significance: Part of a remarkable group of plate from the English Reformed Church in The Hague which was given to the church by individual members of the congregation.

Historical context note

Gifts to the Church
Gifts were the most important source of English church plate in the 17th century. The donor was usually a prominent member of the community, which in country parishes often meant the local landowner. But gifts came from other sources too. Many were given by women, showing their active involvement with the church. Churchwardens also took pride in commissioning new silver and often contributed to the cost. Occasionally, gifts like Lord Hertford’s chalice and flagon were made to win support for a political cause.

Not all of these gifts were new. Old-fashioned domestic plate, often richly decorated with secular ornament, was welcomed and used for the service of communion or the collection of alms.

Church Plate from The Hague
This impressively austere service was given to the English Reformed Church in The Hague between 1673 and 1711 by different members of the congregation. It was made by four different local goldsmiths. The provision of stands for the vessels is most unusual. The church closed in 1822, and the plate was later used in the chapel of the British Embassy in The Hague.

One of a set of three, these large dishes carried the communion bread to the altar for consecration. This one was given by Jan van der Heyden of Gouda, Holland.

Descriptive line

Silver, The Hague, 1685, mark of Pieter van der Hegge

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

E.A.Jones,Old Silver Sacramental Vessels of Some English Churches in Holland, The Burlington Magazine, volume 13, April 1908.
Voet, Elias Merken Van Haagsche Goud-en Zilversmedens Gravenhage Martinus Nijhoff 1941, p.161, ref.38a, p.257

Labels and date

Consecration Dishes
One of a set of three, this large dish carried the communion bread to the altar for consecration. It was part of an impressively austere service given to the English Reformed Church in The Hague between 1673 and 1711 by different members of the congregation. The donors were Jan van der Hayden, a lawyer from Gouda, and Jacob Havius, both elders of the church. One of the dishes bears van der Hayden’s coat of arms.

The Hague, the Netherlands, 1685;
by Pieter van der Hegge (1652–96)
Silver
Museum nos. M.6 to 8-1995 [22/11/2005]

Materials

Silver

Techniques

Engraved

Subjects depicted

Coat of arms

Categories

Metalwork; Christianity; Religion

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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