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Bacchus

Statuette
ca. 1590-ca. 1625 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This statuette or firedog figure representing Bacchus is made in the style of Nicolò Roccatagliata in Venice in Italy in about 1590-1625.

Niccolo Roccatagliata (active 1593-1636), was an Italian sculptor, mostly producing work in Venice. In the 1590s the centre of his activity was San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice. Another important work, done in 1633, is the altar frontal in S Moise, in Venice. It is his last work. Bacchus is the Roman god of wine (Greek equivalent is Dionysos).

Firedogs or andirons were placed within the fireplace and would have been used to hold utensials which were required for tending the fire. Often, firedogs do not even appear on inventories, which indicates their status as standard household objects, not necessarily worthy of particular note.



object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Bronze
Brief Description
Statuette, bronze, firedog figure of Bacchus, in the style of Nicolò Roccatagliata, Italy (Venice), ca. 1590-1625
Physical Description
Bronze statuette of Bacchus for an andiron. He stands, naked except for a girdle of vine leaves and grapes, his left foot forward, his right resting on a small barrel. His left hand is raised, holding a jug from which he is pouring wine into a (missing) cup held in his right hand. His head, crowned with vine leaves, is turned sharply to his left.
Dimensions
  • Height: 42.5cm
  • Width: 16cm
  • Diameter: 9cm (Note: of base)
  • Weight: 5,445.8g
Credit line
Salting Bequest
Object history
From the Salting bequest in 1910.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This statuette or firedog figure representing Bacchus is made in the style of Nicolò Roccatagliata in Venice in Italy in about 1590-1625.



Niccolo Roccatagliata (active 1593-1636), was an Italian sculptor, mostly producing work in Venice. In the 1590s the centre of his activity was San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice. Another important work, done in 1633, is the altar frontal in S Moise, in Venice. It is his last work. Bacchus is the Roman god of wine (Greek equivalent is Dionysos).



Firedogs or andirons were placed within the fireplace and would have been used to hold utensials which were required for tending the fire. Often, firedogs do not even appear on inventories, which indicates their status as standard household objects, not necessarily worthy of particular note.



Bibliographic References
  • Mariacher, Giovanni. La Scultura del Cinquecento. In: series Storia dell'Arte in Italia, Turin 1987, p. 200
  • 'Salting Bequest (A. 70 to A. 1029-1910) / Murray Bequest (A. 1030 to A. 1096-1910)'. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum (Department of Architecture and Sculpture). London: Printed under the Authority of his Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, East Harding Street, EC, p. 6
  • Motture, Peta. “The Production of Firedogs in Renaissance Venice”, in: Motture, Peta (ed.), Large Bronzes in the Renaissance, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2003, pp. 276-307p. 297
  • Motture, Peta. “The Production of Firedogs in Renaissance Venice”, in: Motture, Peta (ed.), Large Bronzes in the Renaissance, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2003, pp. 276-307
Collection
Accession Number
A.100-1910

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record createdOctober 21, 2004
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