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Paten

  • Object:

    Paten

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)
    England (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1775 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Glass, engraved on the wheel and gilt

  • Credit Line:

    Given by the Friends of the Victoria and Albert Museum

  • Museum number:

    C.62A-1988

  • Gallery location:

    Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries, case 2C

The chalice and paten were made for the chapel of the Magdalen Hospital for Penitent Prostitutes, founded in 1758 in Whitechapel by Robert Dingley. The paten was used to serve the sacramental bread or wafers that were received as the body of Christ at a Holy Communion service which recalls the Last Supper of Jesus with his disciples.

Physical description

The paten has no foot. It is engraved with leafy sprays and with the gilded inscription 'MAGDALENE CHARITY THE GLORY BE TO GOD'

Place of Origin

London (made)
England (made)

Date

ca. 1775 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Glass, engraved on the wheel and gilt

Marks and inscriptions

It is engraved with leafy sprays and with the gilded inscription 'MAGDALENE CHARITY THE GLORY BE TO GOD'

Dimensions

Diameter: 21 cm paten

Object history note

This chalice and paten is an extremely rare example of communion ware in glass.

Historical significance: Providing support for those in need was seen as a Christian virtue. In 18th century London leading citizens founded institutions by subscription to assist the poor, sick and isolated. The Magdalen Hospital was set up to reform repentant prostitutes by teaching them Christian principles.

Historical context note

Made for the chapel of the Magdalen Hospital for Penitent Prostitutes in St. George's Fields, Southwark.

Descriptive line

Paten, glass engraved with leafy sprays and with the gilded inscription London, ca. 1775

Labels and date

MAGDALEN HOSPITAL CHALICE AND PATEN

The hospital, originally for the reform and relief of penitent prostitutes, was founded in Whitechapel in 1758 and moved to St. George's Fields, Southwark in 1772. In 1868 it moved again to Streatham and became a secondary school. This chalice and paten is an extremely rare example of communion ware in glass.

England (London), around 1775
Glass
Museum no. C.62&A-1988 []

Materials

Glass

Techniques

Engraving; Glass-blowing

Categories

Glass; Christianity; Religion

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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