Mary, Queen of Scots, A Prisoner thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F , Case X, Shelf 546, Box A

Mary, Queen of Scots, A Prisoner

Photograph
ca. 1860s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin



object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Stereoscopic photograph
Brief Description
Stereograph by James Elliott entitled 'Mary, Queen of Scots, A Prisoner'. Great Britain, ca. late 19th century.
Dimensions
  • Size of card height: 8.5cm
  • Width: 17.4cm
Gallery Label
  • Making It Up: Photographic Fictions (2018) As in today’s period dramas, the sets, props and costumes used to stage this moment from history would have transported viewers to another time and place. The experience would have been particularly immersive when seen in three dimensions through a stereoscope. Marta Weiss
  • Label for 'Making It Up: Photographic Fictions' (3 May 2013 - 12 January 2014): Probably John Reynolds The Angel's Whisper James Elliott (1835–1903) Mary Queen of Scots. A Prisoner Unknown photographers The Captive Woman selling apples from a basket Probably Martin Laroche (1810–86) Astounding Apparition! Unknown photographer Frogs playing pool and smoking clay pipes About 1860 A stereograph is a pair of photographic images of the same subject taken from slightly different angles. This gives the illusion of a three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereoscope. These optical devices occupied a place in the drawing room, as a television might today, providing entertainment that was both amusing and instructive. Stereographs were the most popular outlet for staged and narrative photography in the 19th century. Stereographs Museum nos. 107, 113, 124, 127, 147-1957, 679-1943
Subjects depicted
Collection
Accession Number
107-1957

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 30, 2009
Record URL