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'The Reading Girl', a statue by Pietro Magni at Crystal Palace

  • Object:

    Photograph

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    1862 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    England, William (photographer)
    London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Stereoscopic photograph

  • Museum number:

    183-1957

  • Gallery location:

    Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F, case X, shelf 546, box G

Physical description

Stereograph from the International Exhibition of 1862 depicting 'The Reading Girl', a statue by Pietro Magni at Crystal Palace. Numbered 68.

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

1862 (made)

Artist/maker

England, William (photographer)
London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Stereoscopic photograph

Dimensions

Height: 7.9 cm Size of each image, Width: 7.5 cm

Descriptive line

Stereograph from the International Exhibition of 1862 depicting 'The Reading Girl', a statue by Pietro Magni at Crystal Palace, photographed by the London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company. Great Britain, 1862.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

The Great Exhibition, the brainchild of Prince Albert, the Consort to Queen Victoria, was conceived during the the 1840s and opened in Hyde Park on 1 May 1851. After a quiet beginning it proved to be a vast success in the six months that it ran and was, up to that time, the greatest peacetime movement of persons ever witnessed. Over six million people visited between May and October. On the last day, 11 October 1851, no fewer than 53,000 people visited the Exhibition.
It was housed in the beautiful Crystal Palace, an inspired design by Joseph Paxton, based on his building of the great glasshouses at Chatsworth.
After the Exhibition, there was great debate about what to do with the Crystal Palace. It could not stay in Hyde Park and was eventually, in 1854, rebuilt at Sydenham in south London. There the Exhibition was re-created anew.
Wild claims have been made regarding stereoviews of the Crystal Palace. Many are claimed to be of the Exhibition in Hyde Park when in fact, apparently none are known to exist.
Views do exist, however, of the Crystal Palace as reconstructed at Sydenham. An especially fine series was produced by T.R. Williams. De la Motte also produced fine views. Exterior views usually illustrate the two distinctive towers (for water storage), which didn't even exist at the Hyde Park site. An entirely separate exhibition set was produced by the London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company for the 1862 exhibition; these were taken by their chief photographer, William England. This exhibition was held in a purpose-built building at South Kensington, known as the 'Brompton Boilers' because of its two large domes, and promptly demolished afterwards.

Materials

Card

Techniques

Photography

Subjects depicted

Statues; Reading; Stereoscope; Stereograms; Sculpture; Stereoscopic

Categories

Photographs; The Great Exhibition

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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