Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Shoe - Wannabe loafer

Wannabe loafer

  • Object:

    Shoe

  • Place of origin:

    Great Britain (made)

  • Date:

    1998 (designed)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Cox, Patrick, born 1963 (designer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Leather with metal and velcro

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Patrick Cox

  • Museum number:

    T.182-1998

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

The influential shoe designer Patrick Cox (born Canada, 1963) is also known as the hero of the 1990s loafer. He created the 'Wannabe' range of chunky loafers for men and women for his Autumn/Winter 1993-94 collection. Much to his surprise the style became so popular that a doorman had to be employed to manage the queues that formed outside his London shop.

In a radio interview (BBC Radio 4) in 1997 Cox explained the shoe’s appeal. 'I think the success of the “Wannabe” loafer is the comfort factor and the cult that built around it…even if you don't want to wear them any more because one too many of your friends have them or too many pop stars wore them that week…you end up wearing them because they are so comfortable.'

Physical description

Black leather loafer with a chunky zip over the instep. Velcro fastening.

Place of Origin

Great Britain (made)

Date

1998 (designed)

Artist/maker

Cox, Patrick, born 1963 (designer)

Materials and Techniques

Leather with metal and velcro

Descriptive line

Leather loafer 'Wannabe loafer' with chunky zip over the instep, designed by Patrick Cox, Great Britain, 1998

Production Note

Autumn/Winter Collection 1998

Materials

Leather; Metal; Velcro

Categories

Accessories; Footwear; Leather; Men's clothes; Fashion; Europeana Fashion Project

Collection

Textiles and Fashion Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.